So, I do my best to make a weekly blog post that sort of “reviews” my latest find in the world of graphic novels. In a true example of applied learning, I got to thinking about alternative means that graphic novels (or comics) are published. Marvel offers a subscription service titled “Marvel Unlimited” that lets one read nearly their entire catalog for only $10 a month. My Kindle is loaded with comic books.

Recently, the most funded Kickstarter campaign of all time was headed partially by the artist at The Oatmeal, which got me to thinking about how web comics and art as a medium on the Internet seems to be growing exponentially. This week, ashamedly, I didn’t make the time to pick up a new graphic novel.

But I did catch up on some of my favorite web comics.

92419582_ba92b71876_o Photo CC-by Roadsidepictures, tangentially relevant, and absurd

Why Web Comics?

I know a lot of people who aren’t familiar with web comics as a medium, or don’t take them very seriously. Granted, the freedom of the Internet means that anyone can get on and share extremely poor work, but self-publishing is a genuine vessel for success. I’ve done it, and I’ve worked with dozens of others who have as well.

The fact that the Internet is free range tends to make most people write independent artists, authors, and musicians as instant hacks. You haven’t heard of them before, they haven’t achieved commercial success – so why bother? This is an incredibly narrow scope. The Internet is a tool to be used for good or evil, all it takes is a little digging to find the good.

As I stated above, web comic artists are on the rise. Many of my favorites that I follow have several novelized versions of their strips out for purchase – which makes it a graphic novel. There are no shortage of tones, themes, or subject matters to be found even in web comics. Want funny? Dark? Nerdy? No problem. Many of these mediums are single-shot, updating weekly with strips that may have no continuity between one another. Others are long, sprawling plot lines, or at the very least have gags / plot points that show up time and time again.

Do I still have your attention? If so, I’m going to use the rest of this post to share with you some of my favorite web comics that I follow weekly. I’ll do my best to get some variety in here, a lot of the ones I follow are video game-related because I am a nerd.

11085522084_4a153845f0_b Photo CC-by Drew Brockington, found on Flickr – Internet art!

Four of my Favorites

Penny Arcade – (Warning: Vulgar Language / Humor) Written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik.

As far as web comics go, Penny Arcade may be the most successful in jumping to real-world business. Largely video game, technology, and tabletop gaming themed, Penny Arcade follows (mostly) the exploits of Gabe and Tycho as they offer humorous, often cynical or critical looks at the gaming industry. There are frequently breaks in the humor in favor of Medieval or Sci-Fi one-shot pieces where Holkins flexes his diverse set of muscles. Penny Arcade began as a webcomic and has branched out into the Penny Arcade Expo: a yearly convention where the biggest comic book and game developers gather to show off the year’s hottest releases. PA also started a charity called Child’s Play, dedicated to raising money to provide games and entertainment to children who are stuck in hospitals. PA is an example of comics being taken seriously as a medium through longevity and ambition.

Zen Pencils  – Illustrated by Gavin Aung Tan

Zen Pencils is a strip done by a former graphic designer who was unsatisfied with his job. Tan’s approach is unlike many others: he takes inspirational quotes or poems and puts them in a comic strip form. Literary buffs will appreciate tan’s knowledge of poetry, but he covers all ends of the spectrum with quotes from the likes of Teddy Roosevelt, Henry Rollins (former Black Flag frontman), Bill Watterson (creator of Calvin and Hobbes), the Dalai Llama, and much more. Readers need not worry about following a plot or vulgarity for vulgarity’s sake. Tan’s work is inspirational, heartwarming, eye-opening, and motivational. Plus he has his own collection of recurring characters. Pretty good stuff.

Poorly Drawn Lines(Warning: Vulgar Language) Written & Illustrated by Reza Farazmand

I don’t have many words that can really explain Poorly Drawn Lines. The art style is often simplistic (but not childish), and the jokes are always off-the-wall. Fans of random, absurd humor will be right at home with Poorly Drawn Lines. Jokes are sometimes pointed / critical of society, but more than often are eyebrow-raisers with little underlying meaning. I can’t really describe this. I’ll just show you:

whole-world

Cyanide and Happiness(Warning: Vulgar Language, Humor, and Graphic Content) Written & Illustrated by Kris Wilson, Rob DenBleyker, Dave McElfatrick, and others

Cyanide and Happiness is a webcomic classic. Almost everyone you know has shared a comic of C&N. Initially a project for fun by one person, C&H has expanded to several artists updating weekly strips with often crass, and explicit humor. The art style remains simplistic, but jokes are often pointed, offensive, and highly critical of most components of society. Fans of dirty (yet smart) humor will be right at home with S&H.

There’s no shortage of subject matter to be found in web comics. There’s also no shortage of writing and artistry talent to be found. At the very least, you now know what it is I do when I’m supposed to be being productive.

ars longa vita brevis

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Comments
  1. angietemple says:

    Great Blog…. Thank you for writing about your four favorites, our choices are memoriable to say the least. The bird one seems crass but honestly that is what you would like to say to your teenager even though we don’t often lead with that sums up life pretty well.

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